UNSW: Sydney’s water supply facing multiple threats

The Sydney Desalination Plant in Kurnell has been reactivated.

The Sydney Desalination Plant in Kurnell has been reactivated.CREDIT:GETTY

CURRENTLY in Sydney despite Level 2 water restrictions our population is increasing, and recent per capita water usage rates have actually increased

😲

Infrastructure Australia in 2017 projected that household water bills would more than quadruple in real terms because of population growth and climate change, rising from $1,226 in 2017 to $6,000 in 2067. *

AGAIN with vested interests at the Top End … and Beryl’s guvmnt pushing for de$al plant$ … over and above recycling …

IT isn’t half obvious, is it, what the solution is?

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UNSW: Sydney’s water supply facing multiple threats

By Leith van Onselen in Australian Economy

January 29, 2020 | 3 comments

Emma Johnston, Dean of Science at UNSW Sydney, is the latest to warn that Sydney’s water supply is under threat from a combination of population growth, reduced rainfall, greater evaporation, and contamination from bushfires. Therefore, more desalination plants will need to be built:

With water restrictions increasing around NSW and talk about Sydney moving to level three sanctions, people are starting to ask what happens if the city’s water supply becomes critically low?

The prognosis is not good.

*Long-term climate forecasts show the drought continuing for a long time. In addition, our population is increasing and recent per capita water usage rates have actually increased.*

Now there is a new threat: the increased risk, severity and extent of bushfires in Australia as a result of climate change…

An enormous amount of ash and debris has built up in water catchment areas as a result of the fires. Our declining supply of fresh water has inevitably suffered some form of contamination, and this will only get worse when the first decent rains fall.

Compounding matters, the bushfires have destroyed much of the river-side vegetation, which acts as a barrier to erosion, meaning run-off and sedimentation will increase.

This combination of factors has very serious potential consequences for our drinking water…

Big cities, regional centres and small hamlets are all going to need more sources of potable water…

Desalination is expected to become an increasingly critical water source for many coastal populations.

Australia has an enormous coastline and we can afford to do desalination well.

Let’s get real. The main driver of Sydney’s budding water shortage is mass immigration.

Sydney’s population has grown by around 1.3 million people (36%) since the Sydney Olympics, and it is projected to grow by another 4.5 million people over the next 48 years all due to mass immigration:

This population explosion will necessarily require a battery of desalination plants to be built along Sydney’s coast. And given desalinated water is around four times as expensive as traditional dam water:

This necessarily means household water bills will rise dramatically, which will adversely impact lower income households in particular.

Indeed, modelling (Deleted?) by Infrastructure Australia in 2017 projected that household water bills would more than quadruple in real terms because of population growth and climate change, rising from $1,226 in 2017 to $6,000 in 2067. *

The report also warned that “the impact of these changes on household affordability could be substantial… and could lead to significant hardship”:

Here is another example of how the mass immigration ‘Big Australia’ policy is wrecking the living standards of the working class.

Australia’s mass immigration policy is now the key threat to Australia’s water security.

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/unsw-sydneys-water-supply-facing-multiple-threats/

NSW Premier Mike Baird, pictured during an April 2016 trip to Israel.

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CHINA Void filled by Hong Kong and Singaporean Commercial Property investors

AFTER CHINA introduced its capital controls into commercial property in 2016 Hong Kong and Singapore picked up where they left off!

HOWEVER … Chinese investors are largely holding onto the assets they have in Australia … including China’s sovereign wealth fund, CIC portfolio of nine (9) office towers including Deutsche Bank, 126 Phillip Street, Sydney, the BT Tower, and 120 Collins Street, Melbourne!!

Total foreign investment levels into Australia’s commercial property market reached $11.5 billion in 2019

Singapore was the biggest foreign buyer by country with about $4.3 billion invested directly in Australia’s commercial property market

READ MORE!

HOW good’s this? Not very … Why not Australian Super and Pension Funds?

  • Hong Kong And Singaporean Investors Fill Void Left By China
Hong Kong and Singaporean investors fill void left by China

Singapore-listed property trust Suntec REIT bought an office development in Sydney for $297 million.

EXTRACT from ‘Hong Kong and Singaporean investors fill void left by China’

by Ingrid Fuary-Wagner

28 JANUARY 2020

‘Mainland China’s investment in commercial real estate in Australia fell off a cliff after peaking in 2015 (?) but other Asian investors have been quick to fill the void as the flow of capital from Hong Kong and Singapore soars to record levels.’

In 2016 China introduced its capital controls policy to stop vast sums going offshore.

Its flow of capital into Australian commercial real estate fell from almost $4Bn in 2015 to $225.8M in 2019.

At the same time Hong Kong investments increased from $465.6 million to almost $2.1 billion in 2019.

In 2019 foreign investment in the commercial property market in Australia reached $11.5Bn

-33% of the total investment; JLL research

-Singapore the largest foreign buyer with $4.3Bn invested in 2019; commercial property market

-U.S. invested some $3Bn

-and increased activity from Hong Kong institutional and private money

-a large investment of capital from the sale of Blackstone’s Sydney CBD office tower to the $31Bn Hong Kong listed Link REIT for $638M

JLL’s head of research Andrew Ballantyne said.

Hong Kong money has been in Australia for a long period of time but I think if you were to highlight a specific factor, obviously what’s going on at the moment in Hong Kong with some of the social unrest is potentially a catalyst for groups looking to invest in offshore markets,” he said.

The fact that the Hong Kong listed Link REIT chose Australia for its first investment outside of Hong Kong and mainland China spoke volumes to how the Australian market was viewed globally, Rob Sewell, JLL’s head of office investments, said.

Diversification benefits and a transparent commercial real estate market will continue to drive foreign investment into Australia, and buyers from Singapore, Hong Kong, Canada and China have also shown a willingness to take partial stakes in top-tier institutional grade stock,” he said.

“If you look at Singapore, a large part of the capital that comes in is either from GIC, their sovereign wealth fund, or the Singaporean REITs, who have a desire to seek geographical diversification in their portfolio and for a lot of them it’s really just about investment in Australia.”

-Singapore is expected to remain at the top of the list of where offshore capital will flow from in 2020

-but the country to watch was Japan

-the Japanese sovereign wealth fund, Government Pension Investment Fund (GPIF), surpassed that of Norway

.the world’s largest with a total asset value of about $2.2 trillion.

“We’re starting to see a little bit more noise coming out of groups from Japan,” Mr Ballantyne said. “GPIF has started to invest in offshore markets. They’ve just bought a part share in Brussels Airport.

“Whether they get captured in our numbers depends on whether they invest directly or invest in a local wholesale fund, which gets classified as domestic [capital].”

*While the inflow of capital from China had stalled, there hadn’t been “a complete outflow” of capital with Chinese investors largely holding on to the assets they have in Australia.

Mr Ballantyne pointed to China’s sovereign wealth fund CIC’s portfolio of:

-nine office towers it acquired for $2.45Bn from Investa Property Group’s portfolio – the largest direct real estate transaction in Australia’s history – in 2015.

Photo: Deutsche Bank, 126 Phillip Street, BT Tower; The Skyscraper Centre photo

Photo: 120 Collins Street, Melbourne; Skyscraper Centre photo

ABOVE PHOTOS two of the office towers acquired by CIC!

SOURCE: https://www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/hong-kong-and-singaporean-investors-fill-void-left-by-china-923953/

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NSW Planning System slowest in Country blamed for Housing Costs

THIS Report would not have been commissioned with instructions … much … would it?

Related Article that spells out what this is really about!

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2020/01/29/nsw-planning-minister-hands-reins-to-developers/

NSW planning system slowest in country, blamed for housing costs

It was the secret report commissioned by NSW Treasury to investigate the state’s planning system. So dire were its findings, it prompted Planning Minister Rod Stokes to declare “the time is ripe for change”.

WHAT THE REPORT FOUND

Ben Pike, Urban Affairs Reporter, The Sunday TelegraphSubscriber only|January 26, 2020 6:00amClosePauseLoaded: 0%Current Time 0:04/Duration 0:30FullscreenYour video will play after the adDevelopers have created a bold vision for Sydney by 2040. So what will these homes look like and where will they go?MORE IN NEWSSydney families ‘lying’ about China travel, parents sayHero ambos save five greyhounds in floodwatersMurder charge for boy over stepmum’s death

A secret report into the state’s planning system reveals NSW has Australia’s slowest system of building approvals for all types of homes – from greenfield sites to detached houses, townhouses and high-rise apartments.

The report commissioned by NSW Treasury has found average time for a Development Application decision blew out from 59 to 84 days — up 44 per cent — between 2015 and 2018.

And Sydneysiders wait even longer. In 2017-2018, determinations in Sydney typically took 30 days longer than the NSW average.

VIEW SOURCE LINK FOR MECONE /NSW TREASURY INTERACTIVE

Medium density housing developments take 200 days in NSW compared to frontrunners WA with 65 days.

NSW’s best result was finishing second-last in low density approval times.

The report, compiled by consultancy Mecone and obtained under freedom of information laws,

was seized on by the developer’s lobby group Urban Taskforce to attack DA delays for driving up property prices.

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“This damning report finds that the time taken to approve development in NSW is crippling productivity, escalating housing affordability problems and driving away potential investment,” Urban Taskforce CEO Tom Forrest said.

Urban Taskforce CEO Tom Forrest.
Urban Taskforce CEO Tom Forrest.
NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes.
NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes.

“It is no wonder the government wanted to keep it a secret. The NSW system is slow and it is underdelivering on housing supply.

“This is a crucial factor in driving up housing prices.”

The report also exposes which council areas are getting away with building fewer homes than they are supposed to — pushing development onto other areas of Sydney.

A new housing estate at Oran Park in Sydney’s south west. Picture: Brendan Esposito
A new housing estate at Oran Park in Sydney’s south west. Picture: Brendan Esposito

Lane Cove, Bayside, Ryde and the Hills have been pulling beyond their weight by exceeding State Government housing targets in the past seven years, with 113-136 per cent of the homes they were asked to approve being built.

But the Blue Mountains, Woollahra, the Hawkesbury and Fairfield councils have chronically underperformed, completing between 37 and 42 per cent.

Housing targets for local councils are a politically sensitive topic. Mr Forrest believes the NSW Government is avoiding making targets mandatory because of the local government elections in September.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian.
Premier Gladys Berejiklian.
Sydney University Professor Peter Phibbs. Picture: Matthew Farrell
Sydney University Professor Peter Phibbs. Picture: Matthew Farrell

NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes said “the results of this report show the time is ripe for change”.

“Last year, the Premier and I announced a package of reforms to boost the timeliness, certainty and transparency of our planning system, by cutting red tape and reducing assessment time frames,” Mr Stokes said.

“We’ll be mandating online DAs in metro councils, which is proven to reduce assessment times by up to 91 per cent.

“This real-time information sharing will stop the finger-pointing and reduce red tape.”

The report has also called for the creation of a minor development matters tribunal, which would save people going through expensive court battles to gain council approval.

NSW is the only state without one.

But Sydney University planning lecturer Professor Peter Phibbs said planning delays can sometimes lead to a better outcome.

“If a DA takes three months longer but we end up with a much better development that people can enjoy for the next 80 years the world probably won’t end,” he said.

“The issue is whether the extra time generates a better outcome.”

SOURCE: https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/nsw-planning-system-slowest-in-country-blamed-for-housing-costs/news-story/928144c1dade5bfe3f4c754e9b081844?fbclid=IwAR2I1KM0a_sGaIeK6b4BXrf3UbpEm5cjpliNO2YOYln1U-nax7xrpH57XHA

NSW planning minister hands reins to developers

DESPITE the proliferation of cracking, combustible cladding not only of aluminium composite but now BIOWOOD ….

contaminated sites sinking homes

AND 85% of dwellings defective on completion

Planning Minister Stokes has promised to slash Red Tape … even further?

To speed up developments … what gr..dy f.t b.s.t.rds … in the UT and PCA …

P.S. from the Comments …

Local councils should implement Local population caps to restrict development – should local residents agree.
If the Fed wishes for a big Australia, they should consult the locals first.

EMAIL YOUR COUNCIL ABOUT THIS!

Education Minister Rob Stokes said the NSW was being left to plan cities "in the dark" because of the lack of an overarching national narrative on population size.

2017: Education Minister Rob Stokes said the NSW was being left to plan cities “in the dark” because of the lack of an overarching national narrative on population size. CREDIT:ADAM MCLEAN

NSW planning minister hands reins to developers

Photo: HT

NSW planning minister hands reins to developers

By Leith van Onselen in Australian PropertyImmigration

January 29, 2020 | 12 comments

In 2017, NSW Planning Minister, Rob Stokes, pushed-back against the federal government’s blind march towards a ‘Big Australia’, claiming it is leaving Sydney forever struggling to keep pace:

Rob Stokes said the state government was left trying to retrofit the NSW’s infrastructure and services to an expanding population, without a clear, transparent trajectory of NSW’s future population.

“It’s impossible to plan if you don’t know what you are planning for,” Mr Stokes said. “There’s no overarching narrative of where we are going”…

Mr Stokes said states were at the mercy of the federal government’s migration policies while bearing the bulk of the infrastructure costs associated with adapting to a growing population.

“Whether it’s planning for patient beds, medical services, the number of new schools and where they are located, housing affordability, or transport routes, ultimately we are planning in the dark if we don’t know what the population is going to do.

“Why are we frightened about having a policy on this? We have policies on everything else.”

However, since being re-elected in March last year, Rob Stokes has curiously changed his rhetoric, embracing the mass development of Sydney.

In June 2019, Stokes announced a scheme to speed up approvals for higher density developments in suburban developments, telling an Urban Development Institute of Australia NSW annual luncheon that he hoped to ensure that all local councils in the state adopt the ‘missing middle’ scheme by the end of 2019:

“I am very passionate about providing for the missing middle … there is a large gap between historical housing supply and what the community wants…

Mr Stokes’ vision is in line with the federal housing minister’s Michael Sukkar’s plan to work better with councils to reduce red tape and to come up with smarter density for more homes

In November, Stokes attacked so-called “NIMBY baby boomers” for opposing high-rise development across Sydney:

Baby Boomers are primarily responsible for hostility toward housing growth and density, Planning Minister Rob Stokes says, accusing the generation of being the drivers of so-called NIMBYism…

*Speaking to developers, planning bureaucrats and community leaders, Mr Stokes said growth had become a concept to be suspected, resisted or treated with outright hostility…

He said many policymakers had grown up during the 1960s and 1970s when “growth started to get its bad name”…

That idea has seeped into the popular culture and is a pervasive, if unrecognised or almost subconscious mental model in many of the people leading the discussion today,” he said.

“So we actually are fighting against a great weight of cultural development over the last 40 or 50 years.”

CAAN: ‘Subconscious mental model’ … would that be akin to the NSW Coalition subliminal messaging that ‘Sydney is Growing’ and the need for higher density housing since 2012, and with the issue of the ‘Green Paper’ the overhaul of the entire NSW Planning System … streamlining … and further messaging ‘have your say’ …. after the fact ….

And then later in November, Stokes claimed that Sydney’s runaway population growth is impossible to control:

A drone shot of a housing development in a semi-rural area.

PHOTO: Wollondilly can feel Sydney’s south-west breathing down its neck. (ABC Illawarra: Justin Huntsdale)

In the next 17 years, Sydney’s population is expected to grow by 1.5 million people, a large percentage of whom will pour into the south-west growth corridor…

Conceding that the city is spreading too far too fast, Planning Minister Rob Stokes has revealed that he wants a new relationship with councils to help manage growth and infrastructure pressures.

“We want to help shape growth,” Mr Stokes said.

“Even if it were a desirable outcome to restrict growth, and I am not sure it necessarily is, but even if that is what people wanted to do that is a completely quixotic quest.

“You can’t stop it, so the best thing you can do is work together”

A shot of a a golden brown field stretching as far as the eye can see.

PHOTO: Some of the farmland at Appin that will be rezoned for homes as part of the new Wilton precinct. (ABC Illawarra: Justin Huntsdale)

*Now, despite the proliferation of cracking, flammable developments across Sydney,  Rob Stokes has promised to slash ‘red tape’ to speed up developments: *

A secret report into the state’s planning system reveals NSW has Australia’s slowest system of building approvals for all types of homes – from greenfield sites to detached houses, townhouses and high-rise apartments.

The report commissioned by NSW Treasury has found average time for a Development Application decision blew out from 59 to 84 days — up 44 per cent — between 2015 and 2018

The report, compiled by consultancy Mecone and obtained under freedom of information laws, was seized on by the developer’s lobby group Urban Taskforce to attack DA delays for driving up property prices.

“This damning report finds that the time taken to approve development in NSW is crippling productivity, escalating housing affordability problems and driving away potential investment,” Urban Taskforce CEO Tom Forrest said.

Urban Taskforce CEO Tom Forrest.
Tom Forrest, Urban Taskforce CEO, Chris Johnson’s replacement … 💩 💩

“It is no wonder the government wanted to keep it a secret. The NSW system is slow and it is underdelivering on housing supply.

“This is a crucial factor in driving up housing prices”…

NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes said “the results of this report show the time is ripe for change”.

“Last year, the Premier and I announced a package of reforms to boost the timeliness, certainty and transparency of our planning system, by cutting red tape and reducing assessment time frames,” Mr Stokes said…

😂
💩

But Sydney University planning lecturer Professor Peter Phibbs said planning delays can sometimes lead to a better outcome.

😊

“If a DA takes three months longer but we end up with a much better development that people can enjoy for the next 80 years the world probably won’t end,” he said.

“The issue is whether the extra time generates a better outcome.”

Sydney University Professor Peter Phibbs. Picture: Matthew Farrell
Sydney University Professor Peter Phibbs. Picture: Matthew Farrell

It is true that Sydney’s planning system is busted, with low quality high-rise mushrooming across some areas while the wealthy inner-east is left largely unscathed.

But is cutting ‘red tape’ really the answer? Won’t this just lead to a more deregulated market and even worse building outcomes?

😟

The key problem is that Sydney is Australia’s immigration capital, with 77,100 net overseas migrants arriving in 2017-18 alone:

Immigration is also projected to drive all of Sydney’s 4.5 million population increase over the next half century:

👿

Stokes’ plan for greater density is really about stuffing people into high-rise apartments, as projected by the Urban Taskforce:

Sydney’s population growth and development pressures could easily be mitigated by simply returning Australia’s net overseas migration (NOM) back to the historical average of around 70,000, from 250,000 currently:

Apartments, townhouses and terraces will soon outnumber stand-alone homes in Sydney.

Apartments, townhouses and terraces will soon outnumber stand-alone homes in Sydney. CREDIT:PETER RAE CHATSWOOD

CAAN: CHATSWOOD, A city being built by CCP money. Search CAAN Website for David Lee, Geopolitical Strategist

VIEW:

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2019/09/01/a-geopolitical-strategist-on-the-mk-hong-kong-the-u-s-and-australia/

Heck, even cutting NOM to 100,000 – still a generous intake – would greatly reduce Sydney’s future population increase and development pressures.

It is true that immigration policy is set by the federal government, so in this sense it is out of the NSW State Government’s control.

But why isn’t the NSW Government lobbying publically for deep cuts to the migrant intake?

As the nation’s largest state, and the centre of political power, it could force the federal government’s hand.

After all, the overwhelming majority of NSW residents strongly oppose further population growth:

They know that population growth means more over-development, crush-loaded infrastructure and services, and lower living standards.

Their views are also supported by Infrastructure Australia’s modelling, which shows projects worsening traffic congestion, longer commute times, and reduced access to jobs, schools, hospitals and green space as Sydney swells to a projected 7.4 million people by 2046 under ongoing mass immigration, regardless of whether Sydney builds up or builds out:

Liveability would obviously worsen further as Sydney’s population balloons to a projected 9.7 million people by 2066.

Instead of handing over control to developers, Stokes and the NSW Government should represent its constituents and demand the federal government slash immigration back to historical levels. That’s the only way to ease housing pressures and safeguard living standards in Sydney.

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes.

NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes.

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/nsw-planning-minister-hands-reins-to-developers/

ScoMo’s war on red tape delivers outsourcing boom

ScoMo’s war on red tape delivers outsourcing boom

ScoMo’s war on red tape delivers outsourcing boom

By Leith van Onselen in Australian budget

January 29, 2020 | 4 comments

Last year, Prime Minister Scott Morrison appointed himself as minister for the public service and announced that he would continue to take an axe through the public service and reduce red tape:

Scott Morrison is poised to put an axe through the public service today with plans to dramatically cut the number of government departments…

The Australian, which flagged the changes in July, understands that several more super-departments will be created in a move to dramatically cut bureaucratic red tape.

At the same time as Scott Morrison is taking an axe through the public service, spending on consultants and contractors is surging, as reported in The AFR last year:

[Commonwealth Auditor-General Grant] Hehir’s original report… showed the government had entered into contracts worth $47.4 billion in the 2017 financial year alone…

Separate data revealed by the Financial Review last year showed the big four firms earned $1.7 billion from the federal government between 2012-13 and 2016-17. During this time, the big four have also emerged as major political donors…

About 15,000 job cuts – bringing the federal public service workforce to its lowest levels since the Howard government – coincided with more than $500 million in spending on consultancy contracts established because of “need for specialised or professional skills” in the period.

Now, another report has emerged on the rapid rise in outsourced IT contracts by the federal government:

The federal government’s outlay on IT contractors likely surpassed $1 billion last year, with new data revealing some agencies have more than doubled their spending on external tech labour since 2014-15.

Around 35 – or a third – of the Commonwealth’s non-corporate and corporate agencies have disclosed their latest expenditure on IT contractors in answers to question on notice from recent budget estimates.

The result is one of the most comprehensive snapshots of IT outsourcing in the Australian Public Service since the government’s annual IT expenditure benchmark report was scrapped in 2017…

The new data, which has been compiled by iTnews, reveals that the 35 agencies spent just over $862 million on IT contractors over the course of the 2018-19 financial year, up from $636 million in 2017-18 and $583.5 million in 2016-17.

But the 2018-19 figure – which represents a $226 million year-on-year increase – does not include spending at two-thirds of Commonwealth agencies, including service delivery juggernauts, Services Australia and the Australian Taxation Office…

When taking into account the remaining agencies, IT contractor cost were almost certainly above $1 billion across the Commonwealth last year.

This outsourcing of roles helps to explain the loss of independence and the politicisation of the public service. Policy development and implementation has effectively been outsourced to consultants, often to support a pre-conceived political agenda.

Rather than cracking down on the insecure ‘gig economy’, the federal government has become a key player.

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/scomos-war-on-red-tape-delivers-outsourcing-boom/

Senate crossbench to derail visa privatisation

“VISA PRIVATISATION is a massive risk. It could lead to increased costs of visas, worker exploitation, data security breaches and will make protecting our national security more difficult.”

VIEW:

Coalition’s Visa Privatisation will torpedo Australia’s borders

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2019/09/13/coalitions-visa-privatisation-will-torpedo-australias-borders/

SEARCH CAAN WEBSITE for Visa Privatisation to trace the history of this outrageous proposal!

The Department of Home Affairs is determining the successful bidder for a project to manage a new online system to process visas.

Photo: The Department of Home Affairs is determining the successful bidder for a project to manage a new online system to process visas.

Senate crossbench to derail visa privatisation

By Leith van Onselen in Immigration

January 29, 2020 | 7 comments

The senate crossbench looks set to scuttle the Morrison Government’s planned privatisation of Australia’s visa system after the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) advised that the reform would likely need to be legislated:

Prime Minister Scott Morrison. The government claims the proposed changes, which would involve private companies processing certain "low-risk visas", will improve efficiency and reduce costs.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison. The government claims the proposed changes, which would involve private companies processing certain “low-risk visas”, will improve efficiency and reduce costs.CREDIT:AAP

The department’s incoming government brief to Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton, released under Freedom of Information laws, says the plan “will likely require new supporting legislation”.

*The contentious proposal could be dead on arrival with Labor, the Greens and Centre Alliance all vowing to vote against the move in the Senate…

🥰

Opposition assistant immigration spokesman Andrew Giles seized on the Home Affairs briefing to claim the government’s plan was “dead in the water”.

“The Department of Home Affairs’ own advice is that this privatisation requires legislative change.

Labor won’t support this. It’s clear that they don’t have the numbers in the Senate,” Mr Giles said.

“Visa privatisation is a massive risk. It could lead to increased costs of visas, worker exploitation, data security breaches and will make protecting our national security more difficult.”

Centre Alliance senator Stirling Griff, whose party holds two votes in the upper house, said the government should remain in full control of all visa systems.

“This is not something that should be outsourced,” he said.

“The government argument for outsourcing the end-to-end system is primarily based on them (government) failing to invest and develop appropriate infrastructure. So they fail and then they consider that’s a good enough reason to drop the ball and spend significant money on having another entity have a go?”

Privatising Australia’s visa processing is unambiguously bad policy.

Visa processing is an essential government service and a natural monopoly.

Its sale will inevitably result in end-users being gouged by the new monopoly private owners, as well as a reduction in transparency.

The first assistant secretary of the Department of Home Affairs, Andrew Kefford, recently boasted that visa privatisation is the “most significant reform to the Australian immigration system in more than 30 years”, and claimed it would make the “visa business” profitable by including “premium services for high-value applicants”, while providing “commercial value-added services”.

The Department of Immigration and Citizenship in Sydney. The outsourced their visa operations

 The Australian government is looking to outsource its visa operations and it wants 90% of applications to be assessed and decided automatically. Photograph: April Fonti/AAP: FEBRUARY 2018

In other words, the Morrison Government would effectively make Australia’s visa system ‘pay to win’ and a profit-based. This is exactly what has happened in the United Kingdom, which privatised its visa processing in 2014 with disastrous results (see here and here).

Adding a profit motive and turning the visa system into a quantity-based “pay to win” business will also eliminate what little integrity there is left, and risks Australia losing complete control of migration numbers.

This whole plan is another case study in the Game of Mates.

Image result for game of mates

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/senate-crossbench-to-derail-visa-privatisation/

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Infrastructure Deficit impossible to fix because …

THIS is a very GOOD READ! WE recommend you SHARE to let others know what’s really happening!

CAAN has highlighted the Key Points!

The claims that Australia just needs to “plan better” and invest more in infrastructure are regularly made by Big Australia enthusiasts.

Australia’s population is expanding by around 400,000 people annually

ABS: Australia gains an extra person every 1 minute and 23 seconds

IN CONCLUSION …

Until Australians make more of an effort to hold their political leaders to account over forced population growth, the infrastructure deficit will only widen and life in our cities will only get worse.

CAAN has devised ‘A Campaign Plan’ which each and everyone of you can own! It can be adapted to this major issue and many others!

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INFRASTRUCTURE DEFICIT IMPOSSIBLE TO FIX WITHOUT TACKLING IMMIGRATION

By Guest in Australian EconomyImmigration

January 28, 2020 | 6 comments

Cross-posted from Online Opinion:

*Australian politicians never tire of telling the public how they are investing record amounts in infrastructure. Barely a day goes by without a minister announcing a new “congestion busting” infrastructure project designed to ease bottlenecks in Australian cities.

Malcolm Turnbull said he wanted to be known as an “infrastructure prime minister”. His predecessor, Tony Abbott, sought the same title. The current government under Scott Morrison has been widely touting its $100 billion infrastructure pipeline since its last budget.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison: "A responsible and sensible government does not run the country as if it is constantly at Defcon 1."

Prime Minister Scott Morrison: “A responsible and sensible government does not run the country as if it is constantly at Defcon 1.”CREDIT:AAP

Yet, even with the hundreds of billions of dollars sunk into new projects, infrastructure supply has not caught up with demand.

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Photo: Search CAAN Website: Population Explosion to Derail Sydney’s Train System

*No matter how much we borrow and build, Australia continues to resemble a dog chasing its own tail when it comes to infrastructure provision. And, as a new report argues, the infrastructure shortfall will only worsen – unless Australia’s extraordinary rate of population growth is substantially reduced.

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Photo: Search CAAN Website: Why are Young Aussies relying on the bank of mum and Dad

Launched in November by former New South Wales Premier Bob Carr on behalf of Sustainable Population Australia, the report – entitled “Population Growth and Infrastructure in Australia: The Catch-Up Illusion” – shows that sustained rapid population growth is resulting in a massive and growing infrastructure backlog, particularly in our largest cities.

*Consequently, the living standards of existing residents are being significantly eroded through intensifying congestion, growing infrastructure costs (e.g. toll roads and water), declining housing affordability, environmental degradation, and overall reduced amenity.

Sydneysiders can expect more of this as we get closer to 2031, according to the audit.

Sydneysiders can expect more of this as we get closer to 2031, according to the audit. DT: Congestion will cost Sydney more than 15 billion a year by 2031

NED 132 Cost of Sydneys Congestion - 0

Photo: Above report.

*It is important to understand the nature and scale of the population problem. Australia’s population is expanding by around 400,000 people annually – the equivalent of adding another Canberra-worth of people every 12 months or, to put it another way, the entire population of East Timor or Estonia every three years. According to the ABS, Australia gains an extra person every 1 minute and 23 seconds.

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CHINA’s airlines fly to Australia; until the CoronaVirus 47,000 Chinese people were flying to Australia each week! (Aust. Health Authorities)

*Immigration is driving more than 60 percent of this population growth. As shown below, net overseas migration (NOM) numbers surged from the early-2000s, with the current immigration intake around three times the historical average.

Australia has long had a higher per capita immigration rate than comparable developed countries but the escalation in recent times is truly stupefying. Australia is currently in the midst of an immigration-fed population expansion that is both unprecedented in Australia’s history and unrivalled in the developed world.

The graphic below demonstrates just how abnormal Australia’s population growth has been compared to that of other developed countries.

*If allowed to continue at present rates, immigration will cause Australia’s population to explode from 25.5 million to around 43 million over the next four-and-a-half decades.

Sydney’s population will swell to 9.7 million, while Melbourne will be an Asian-style megacity of 10.2 million. Both will have populations comparable in size to Australia’s total population in the 1950s.

In The Catch-up Illusion, authors Leith van Onselen, Jane O’Sullivan and Peter G Cook assert that no amount of decentralisation, planning or investment will allow infrastructure to keep up with such manic population growth.

They convincingly debunk the myth peddled by the Morrison Government that sending migrants to the bush is a solution to our mounting population pressures. Migrants may temporarily settle in regional areas to satisfy visa requirements but tend to gravitate toward the major cities once they have secured residency. This trend is clear in recent migrant settlement patterns.

Photo: Guardian Australia: Cobargo NSW before and after the Bushfire!

  • Scott Morrison himself dismissed the idea of decentralisation as a realistic fix back in 2010 when he was in opposition, stating: “…to hold out some false hope that this problem’s going to be solved because a Population Minister is going to fantastically move people around like has never been done before in our history, is I think unfair to the Australian people to suggest that that is realistic option, certainly in the short or medium term.”
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Of course, Morrison has since changed his tune on decentralisation and evidently now expects Australians to believe that his government will succeed where all others have failed.

Even if meaningful decentralisation could be achieved, it would not ease the burden of delivering sufficient new infrastructure. With many regional areas already lacking adequate infrastructure, industry, jobs and even water, funnelling millions more people into regional cities and towns is likely to end in tears and misery.

*The claims that Australia just needs to “plan better” and invest more in infrastructure are regularly made by Big Australia enthusiasts.

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The destruction and demolition of many heritage homes in the Garden Suburb of Haberfield in the path of Westconnex.

Interchange construction at the old Rozelle train yards.

Interchange construction at the old Rozelle train yards.CREDIT:NICK MOIR

Gavin Gilchrist, Jo Haylen MP, Sophie Cox, Cathy Brown, Mary Lordan and Kathy Bluff aren't happy about the state government's planned overpass.

Community members including Jo Haylen MP unhappy about the NSW Govt planned overpass. CREDIT:NICK MOIR September 2019. The area has since been cleared! Many homes demolished on Victoria Road, Rozelle near the Iron Cove Bridge. SMH: Little Los Angeles Sydney’s Inner West hits back at road tunnel plan.

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Photo: Search CAAN Website: Sydney Desal Plant to Expand but at what Cost to us?

However, as the Sustainable Population Australia report makes clear, the cost of providing new infrastructure across Australia’s already built-out cities is prohibitive due to dis-economies of scale and the constantly moving target of a rapidly expanding population. *

It is estimated that each new person added to the population requires well over $100,000 of public infrastructure to enjoy the same standard provided to incumbent residents. Thus, the cost of adding a new Canberra-worth of people every year easily runs into the tens of billions of dollars.

Northern Beaches Hospital.

Northern Beaches Hospital.CREDIT:BROOK MITCHELL; SMH: Abandon public-private model at Northern Beaches Hospital, doctors urge state government

In Australia’s already sprawling major cities, the cost of retrofitting is eye-wateringly expensive because of the need for tunnelling and land buy-backs and the disruption to existing infrastructure. Take, for example, Melbourne’s West Gate Tunnel which is expected to cost $6.7 billion for five kilometres of highway. Per lane-kilometre, this will be 42 times more expensive than the Woolgoolga-Ballina highway upgrade project in New South Wales.

*The evidence is clear: Australia is abjectly failing to build sufficient economic and social infrastructure to cater for rapid population growth caused primarily by 15 years of hyper immigration. *

Infrastructure Australia concluded in 2013 that the infrastructure deficit was already then at around $300 billion. As more people flood into our major cities, the cost and complexity of providing additional infrastructure will continue to increase substantially. The Productivity Commission noted in 2016 that such costs “will inevitably be borne by the Australian community either through user-pays fees or general taxation…”

Existing residents are also being forced to endure greater congestion and longer commute times, more expensive and smaller housing, longer hospital queues, more competition for school places, lower wages, and the rapid transformation of their communities into places they no longer recognise.

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CAAN Photo: The Ponds; July 2018. Housing on tiny lots as per the Greenfields Housing Code of 200M2 X 6M wide! Perhaps better than a hole in a wall however on such tiny lots no room for a shady tree, pool, bbq, play equipment!

Kellyville has changed dramatically over time. Photo: Nearmap

Photo: Kellyville has changed dramatically over time. Photo: Nearmap ‘From McMansions to higher density: Sydney’s Hills District quietly carving out a new identity’; July 2017

*The deliberate addition of millions more people will also severely hamper Australia’s ability to meet its carbon emissions reduction targets, place more pressure on already stressed ecosystems and native habitats, and further dilute our natural resources.

Search CAAN Website: ‘Left Hanging … How they’re killing the Koalas of Wilton.’ Threatened by loss of habitat due to overdevelopment; September 2018 before the fires of 2019/2020!

*Recent polls by Newspoll, Essential, the Lowy Institute, the Centre for Independent Studies, the ANU and the Australian Population Research Institute show that Australians are increasingly fed up with extremely high immigration and attendant population growth.

In each survey, a majority of respondents wanted a decrease in immigration.

Yet the major political parties remain hooked on Big Australia mass immigration and refuse to allow an honest debate about population numbers.

The Australian Population Research Institute’s Bob Birrell and Katharine Betts have observed that the prevailing view among Australian elites is that all is well with their high immigration experiment.

Harry Triguboff PropertyRank 3 $13.54b

Hui Wing Mau PropertyRank 4 $10.39b

John Gandel Retail Rank10 $6.6b

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Lucy in the Sky, Chief Commissioner, GSC

When confronted with concerns, the major political parties, large sections of the media and those with a vested commercial interest in high immigration – property developers, retailers, the universities, employers seeking cheap labour and other members of the ‘growth lobby’claim that running a pedal-to-the-metal immigration program is good for economic growth and thus for the betterment of the country.

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It is conveniently ignored that while adding more people might make the economy bigger, it does not make Australians richer per head.

*Although rarely mentioned among the Australian commentariat, the enormous expansion in immigration numbers has coincided with a collapse in real per capita household income growth.

Van Onselen, O’Sullivan and Cook observe the irony in the fact that the staggering infrastructure costs associated with population growth are:

counted as additions to economic growth (additions to GDP), yet are unlikely to translate into benefits of improved per capita income or well-being for the existing population.

Rather, they get passed down the line to residents in the form of extra charges and the lived experience of congestion and reduced amenity.

*Until Australians make more of an effort to hold their political leaders to account over forced population growth, the infrastructure deficit will only widen and life in our cities will only get worse.*

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/infrastructure-deficit-impossible-to-fix-without-tackling-immigration/

Construction workers near the tunnel boring machine named Nancy, which broke through at the new Pitt Street station on Friday.

Photo: SMH: Construction workers near the tunnel boring machine named Nancy, which broke through at the new Pitt Street station on Friday.CREDIT:WOLTER PEETERS

Mayors hatch plan to save Centennial Park from developers

Mayors hatch plan to save Centennial Park from developers

Andrew Taylor
By Andrew Taylor

Sydney mayors are calling for new planning rules to protect Centennial Park from the impact of private developments amid fears that the park’s views and heritage values are under threat.

Towers up to 36 metres high could be built opposite the park on Oxford Street following a decision by the Independent Planning Commission last year to approve a proposal for two 11-storey buildings housing 94 apartments and retail space.

Sydney's mayors are calling for new planning rules to protect Centennial Park from developments along its perimeter.
Sydney’s mayors are calling for new planning rules to protect Centennial Park from developments along its perimeter.CREDIT:ISABELLA PORRAS

Paula Masselos, the Labor mayor of Waverley Council, said stronger planning rules were “urgently needed” to protect the park’s heritage values and amenity, and discourage landowners from seeking changes to building height controls.

The NSW Department of Planning, Industry and Environment approved changes to planning rules at the site on Oxford Street following the IPC decision.Advertisement

“The decision took into account potential impacts on the park,” a DPIE spokeswoman said.

But Cr Masselos criticised the decision, saying it created a precedent for increasing heights along the park’s edge that might encourage other landowners to build towers.

Unsolicited planning proposals to develop the Waverley bus depot, opposite the park, had been submitted in the past and Cr Masselos said the council was “closely monitoring this site”.

The park, which is listed on the National Heritage Register, falls within the boundaries of Randwick Council, but it is adjacent to three other councils – Waverley, Woollahra and the City of Sydney.

Cr Masselos will meet with the mayors of neighbouring councils next month to discuss new planning rules for developments along the park’s perimeter.

Sydney mayors are eager to protect the heritage values and views of Centennial Park.
Sydney mayors are eager to protect the heritage values and views of Centennial Park.CREDIT:ISABELLA PORRAS

One option is to replace each council’s planning controls with one set of rules, known as a state environmental planning policy (SEPP), to control development around the park.

“This policy could overrule local planning controls that might impact on the significance of the park,” Cr Masselos said.

The Western Sydney Parklands and Moore Park Showgrounds each have SEPPs, but a DPIE spokeswoman said they did not apply to development outside of their boundaries: “The SEPP model – if applied to Centennial Park – would have had no impact on the proposal at 194 Oxford because it’s outside of the park.”

Sydney Lord Mayor Clover Moore said efforts to protect green space were important given increasing densities and more people living in apartments.

“Successive state governments have failed to protect the parklands, allowing car parks, private development, elite sporting facilities, function centres, and the $38 million Tibby Cotter bridge to nowhere,” she said.

“These assaults would be unthinkable for New York’s Central Park or London’s Hyde Park.”

Susan Wynne, the Liberal mayor of Woollahra Municipal Council, said the council had already taken measures to prevent inappropriate development in areas adjacent to the park.

“This means the controls for this area do not facilitate high-rise redevelopment and support our commitment to protecting the Park’s local perimeter,” she said.

“It would seem logical that there is a consistent approach with regards to these development controls within the vicinity of Centennial Parklands.”

Randwick’s Labor mayor Danny Said said he would also join the meeting to investigate ways of strengthening planning controls to protect the park.

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Sydney's Centennial Park heritage listed
SYDNEY

Sydney’s Centennial Park heritage listed

A spokeswoman for the Centennial Park & Moore Park Trust, which manages the park, said it was protected under environmental laws that “we believe helps to maintain the integrity of this public asset for generations to come”.

A plan of management also guided the decision-making by the trust, local councils and planning bodies.

“Centennial Parklands is the green lungs of the city and at every turn we work to ensure the protection of this significant space,” she said.

Andrew Taylor
Andrew Taylor

Andrew Taylor is a Senior Reporter for The Sydney Morning Herald.

SOURCE: https://www.smh.com.au/national/mayors-hatch-plan-to-save-centennial-park-from-developers-20200123-p53u5j.html

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SHANE OLIVER … UnderEmployment a chronic problem for AUSTRALIA

When you add 200,000-plus migrants to the economy every year, most of working age … does that create a lot of competition for jobs? Is that why we have lost our bargaining power for a fair day’s pay?

DOES it seem that this suits the Top End of Town … ?

WHEN Pauline’s, PHON called for a stop to mass migration … but then gave Party preferences to the Coalition … what does that tell you?

AND Palmer’s UAP campaigned against further immigration … and also gave Party preferences to the Coalition … what does that tell you?

With permanent migration and manipulation of Temp. Visas for a ‘Permanent Resident Visa’ Australia grows its population!

0% light green ranging to 2%, 4%, 6% 8%, 10%, 12%, 14%, 16%, 18% to 20% dark blue

Source: ABS

Shane Oliver: Underemployment “a chronic problem” for Australia

By Leith van Onselen in Australian Economy

January 28, 2020 | 10 comments

AMP chief economist, Shane Oliver, has warned that labour underutilisation is now “a chronic problem for Australia”, is far higher than other developed nations, and will continue to depress wage growth:

“It has been trending up this year and has been high for a while now, since the global financial crisis,” he said. “It’s indicative of a greater level of hardship for some workers.

“It means we need to run the economy harder and we need more growth to use the excess capacity in the labour force”…

Dr Oliver said the trend in underutilisation was reflected in the relatively low increases in wages and salaries.

“I’d say it’s the single biggest explanation for low wages growth,” he said.

“Obviously there is a changing nature to the labour market that has contributed to the underutilisation rate but underlying it all is the weakness in the economy”…

ALP MP Dr Daniel Mulino, who was an economist before entering Parliament, agreed with Oliver’s assessment:

“When large numbers of Australians are unemployed or underemployed, it means that there’s considerable slack in the labour market placing downward pressure on wages.”

The Guardian’s Greg Jericho separately weighed-in with a similar assessment:

This also continues the story of the past five years, where the rate of people in employment has risen almost back to pre-GFC levels, while the average hours worked remains well below the peak of 2008.

And with that weak growth of hours worked comes the rise in underemployment – the biggest factor keeping wages growth low.

*While there are a range of factors at play suppressing wages, commentators conveniently ignore the biggest single driver of Australia’s rising labour supply and overcapacity: mass immigration.

CAAN: And through the backdoor of visa manipulation!

MB: Net immigration into Australia has surged over recent years:

*Net overseas migration is also directly responsible for more than 60% of Australia’s population growth.

The lion’s share of recent migrants are of prime working age and, therefore, have high labour force participation.

recent paper by Melbourne University Professor, Peter McDonald, found that around three quarters of employment growth in Australia between 2011 and 2016 was attributed to immigration:

The permanent and temporary skilled migration policies established by the Australian Government from 1995 played an important role in meeting that labour demand, especially in the boom years of the first decade of the 21st century…

CAAN: The late 1990s during the Howard Government!

*MB: From July 2011 to July 2016, employment in Australia increased by 738,800. Immigrants accounted for 613,400 of the total increase

*Migration has had a very large effect on the age structure of employment with most new immigrant workers (595,300) being under 55 years.

*Therefore, the ongoing supply shock from immigration is a key reason why labour supply continues to outrun demand and why wage growth remains anaemic.

*The systemic wage theft from temporary migrants, which has become entrenched across the economy as temporary visas have ballooned, obviously adds to the problem of low wage growth:

*Entire industries have become heavily reliant on migrant workers to perform low-skilled work in the labour market often for below award rates, which is unambiguously undercutting local workers and lowering overall wage growth.

Independent economist, Gerard Minacksummarised the problem as follows in November for The ABC:

High immigration levels also mean that more people want work.

That, in turn, means there is no need for employers to give people pay rises to keep them on.

“The biggest single problem since the GFC 10 years ago is that we have struggled to get any income or wage growth,” Mr Minack said.

“Why is that? A massive increase in labour supply.”

Too right. When you add 200,000-plus migrants to the economy every year, most with work rights, then it represents a massive rolling labour supply shock which must be absorbed.

Therefore, if policy makers want higher wage growth, they must slash immigration.

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs

‘While 2019 was a generally fine year for workers, there were not enough full-time jobs around to not just reduce unemployment but – crucially – underemployment.’ Photograph: Mick Tsikas/AAP

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/shane-oliver-underemployment-a-chronic-problem-for-australia/

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George Megalopolis hails Melbourne’s diving living standards

Melbourne skyline at dawn. The city is expected to overtake Sydney as the nation's most populous by 2026.

Melbourne skyline at dawn. The city is expected to overtake Sydney as the nation’s most populous by 2026. CREDIT:LEIGH HENNINGHAM.

George Megalopolis hails Melbourne’s diving living standards

By Leith van Onselen in Australian EconomyImmigration

January 28, 2020 | 28 comments

Political commentator, George Megalogenis, penned a long-winded article in The Age’s Good Weekend hailing the rise of Melbourne to Australia’s largest city, and how this will make it the cultural, political and economic capital of Australia:

The rise of Melbourne is shaping up to be the social and economic story of the 21st century, tilting the population south for the first time since the full employment era of the 1960s, when Victoria last dominated the nation’s political life under the government of Robert Menzies. If the trend holds, and the electoral pendulum follows the population, it will force us to change the way we think of ourselves as Australians.

Greater Melbourne grew by one million people between 2008 and 2018, pushing its total population past 5 million as the nation’s crossed 25 million. Sydney added just over 800,000 people over the same period to reach a population of 5.2 million, while Brisbane’s population increased by 450,000 to 2.5 million.

Those raw numbers actually understate the shift. Melbourne is growing at a faster rate than any capital or regional city in the country…

Melbourne’s population is arguably already larger than Sydney’s, depending on where the boundaries are set. The Australian Bureau of Statistics includes the Central Coast in its definition of Greater Sydney, but leaves Geelong out of its definition of Greater Melbourne. Remove the Central Coast and Melbourne had 75,000 more people than Sydney, according to the latest data for 2018.

Jobs, education, lifestyle and, most importantly, an international reputation as a welcoming city for migrants are Melbourne’s drawcards at the moment…

Melbourne is the first Australian city in which the largest ethnic community are migrants born in India, followed by those born in China…

But Melbourne’s ethnic face, with the Indians first, the Chinese second and the English third, is expected to become the nation’s before the end of the 2020s, as cities and regions increasingly rely on migration for population growth…

As Melbourne passes Queensland, and then Sydney, and as the Indians and Chinese rise to first and second place among the migrant communities, history will be made at the core of our identity. Indigenous Australians will outnumber the English-born for the first time since the 1820s. At that point we can stop pretending we are just a white nation.

In the circa 5,000 word article, George Megalogenis doesn’t once mention any downsides from Melbourne’s hyper-growth. Rather, it is presented as being unambiguously positive.

This is strange given in May 2017, Megalogenis warned that the immigration tidal wave flooding into Melbourne and Sydney is “potentially catastrophic” and called for a concerted policy of decentralisation:

“If most of the population growth that’s already in train for the next 10, 20, 30 years ends up in Sydney and Melbourne, we’ve got a problem. But if we are able to pull-off decentralisation – something we’ve been talking about for more than 100 years as a nation… – we may be able to fit the next 10 or 20 million people a lot easier than otherwise would be the case”…

“You look at Sydney’s topography and it can’t fit another million people easily. And you look at Melbourne’s, and it will fit in another million but at the expense of livability because they just keep pushing the boundary out. That next million, that next two million, that each city knows is in train could be divided quite neatly across not just the Eastern Seaboard but inland…”

“The default setting to me could potentially be catastrophic for the country over the next 20 years if people just end up in Melbourne and Sydney”.

As we know, Melbourne’s population is officially projected by the ABS to more than double to 10.2 million people over the next half a century:

Given it took Melbourne around 170 years to reach a population of 3.3 million people in 2001, tripling that number to more than 10 million people in only 65 years (i.e. by 2066) is sheer madness and explains why quality of life is being obliterated under the mass immigration ‘Big Australia’ policy.

Remember, Infrastructure Australia’s own projections are for all indicators of liveability in Melbourne to deteriorate as its population swells to a projected 7.3 million by 2046 (let alone to 10.2 million by 2066):

If George Megalogenis was intellectually honest, he would have mentioned these costs in his 5,000 word puff piece hailing Melbourne’s cancerous growth.

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

Scott Morrison did not need to rely on the Melbourne vote to win the federal election.

Scott Morrison did not need to rely on the Melbourne vote to win the federal election. CREDIT:DOMINIC LORRIMER

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/george-megalopolis-hails-melbournes-diving-living-standards/

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