WERRINGTON near UWS: Lendlease plans new housing estate

DESPITE Western Sydney having less than 6% of the Cumberland Plain Woodland remaining another development proposal for Western Sydney!

WITH lots starting from 290M2, 90sq metres more than the Greenfields Housing Code!

The site will be close to Penrith CBD if approved.
The site will be close to Penrith CBD if approved.

LENDLEASE has lodged plans with Penrith Council for a development on a 28 HECTARE site west of Werrington Road and north of the Great Western Highway to include:

-265 new residential lots

-14 industrial lots

Among open spaces and new roads

To be bordered on the south by the Cobham Youth Justice Centre and on the west by the Western Sydney University -Werrington.

Werrington will be Lendlease’s second major residential development in the outer western suburbs after Jordan Springs

Lendlease plans to develop a residential estate with 265 residential lots in Werrington. Picture: Supplied.
Lendlease plans to develop a residential estate with 265 residential lots in Werrington. Picture: Supplied.

EXTRACT:

‘Lendlease would remove trees in preparation for bulk earthworks and civil works across the site.

These works would established the proposed site levels and allow the construction of new roads, including an east-west collector road.’

The developer has proposed:

-to build a new roundabout on the corner of Werrington Rd and Rance Rd to facilitate traffic in and out of the new estate; and an exhibition village.

The site of a proposed roundabout that will provide better access to a planned residential estate in Werrington. Picture: Google
The site of a proposed roundabout that will provide better access to a planned residential estate in Werrington. Picture: Google
Some of the land in Werrington that could be redeveloped into a residential estate under plans lodged with Penrith Council.
Some of the land in Werrington that could be redeveloped into a residential estate under plans lodged with Penrith Council.

Most lots between 290 M2 and 450 M2; only 11 lots expected to be more than 450M2; the largest lot proposed at 735.2M2

-documents attached to the DA reveal more than 300,000 cubic metres of material to level the site

-residents could be impacted by rail noise from the western railway just north of the estate with Werrington station less than one kilometre away

WILL these lots be available for the Australian First Home Buyer market, or sold off overseas?

READ MORE: Werrington: Lendlease plans New Housing Estate near University of Western Sydney

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/penrith-press/werrington-lendlease-plans-new-housing-estate-near-university-of-western-sydney/news-story/aa55819746a2e31345e9f50ec2e70894

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LANE COVE OFFICE DELIVERS BIG RETURN FOR FUND MANAGER

PROPERTY COUNCIL OF AUSTRALIA

LANE COVE OFFICE DELIVERS BIG RETURN FOR FUND MANAGER

15 DEC 2015PROPERTY AUSTRALIA

A Malaysian property investor has purchased a suburban office in Sydney’s north for $27.8 million, giving its vendor a return to investors of 140 per cent.

The property was purchased by Epic Doncaster, an investment vehicle owned by Malaysia’s 35th richest person, Ong Leong Huat.

The vendor, Melbourne-based property fund manager Quintessential Equity, acquired the property in April 2013 for $12.715 million.

At the time, the building’s occupancy was at 80 per cent. A subsequent upgrade has delivered near 100 per cent occupancy.

Quintessential Equity’s head of property, Russell Bullen, says the net passing income from the long-term tenancies, coupled with the significant enhancements made to the property since acquisition, made for an extremely attractive sale proposition.

“We put this asset on the market because we had executed on our strategy and believed it was prime for sale – it was almost fully leased to very strong covenants, delivering a net passing income close to $2.5 million per annum, the NABERS Energy rating had been increased by 2.5 stars due to successful energy efficiency initiatives, and significant building upgrades had been made,” Bullen says.

The building at 166 Epping Road, Lane Cove has three levels of office space and two levels of basement car parking for 236 cars.

The sale, negotiated by Knight Frank and CBRE, was made on a yield of nine per cent.

Quintessential Equity says the deal delivers an internal rate of return of around 50 per cent and a total return of around 140 per cent to investors.

Knight Frank’s head of Asian Capital Markets, Dominic Ong, says the location and the fact that it neighbours Meriton’s high density residential tower set for completion next year made it one of the most unique opportunities on the market.

“We expect offshore investors will continue to be strong buyers of North Shore property, particularly as yields in the Sydney CBD become tighter,” Ong says.

CBRE’s executive managing director, Scott Gray-Spencer, says the “massive amounts of stock withdrawal due to residential conversion” occurring in the area meant that well-located and high-yielding commercial investments like 166 Epping Road were highly sought after.

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Chinese Delegation explores economic and trade opportunities … Central Coast

Chinese delegation explores economic and trade opportunities

Members of the Chinese delegation visited Family Fresh Farms at Peats Ridge during their visit

POSTED BY: CENTRAL COAST NEWSPAPERS… OCTOBER 31, 2019

Alandmark visit to the Central Coast in October by a Chinese delegation exploring economic and trade opportunities was a “critical step” for the region, according to Regional Development Australia Central Coast (RDACC) CEO, John Mouland.
RDACC and its project partners hosted the 27th NSW-Guangdong Joint Economic Meeting regional visit on October 24.
“Regarded as the most significant trade and investment initiative between NSW and China in 2019, the Sister State relationship between NSW and Guangdong facilitates mutually beneficial economic and trade opportunities for both areas,” Mouland said.
“(We were) proud to showcase some of the best assets that the Central Coast has to offer to this important international audience.
“Being a part of this crucial economic initiative has given us the opportunity to highlight the work being done as a part of the Central Coast Food Innovation Region initiative, a critical economic development project designed to leverage our existing regional strengths and realise economic benefit by growing and innovating our local food, beverage and agricultural industry.
“To allow this international delegation to experience first hand some of our most unique and iconic hospitality venues and our local agricultural industry and best practice research centres, supports our overarching aims to grow jobs, build regional business competitiveness, develop export opportunities and encourage national and international trade through innovation, education and research.”
Mouland said the visit put the region on the map in terms of international export, trade and investment opportunities for the Coast’s agricultural, food production and hospitality sector.
The visit coincided with the 40th anniversary of the Sister State relationship.
“I recently had the privilege to travel, as part of a government delegation, to Guangzhou, and was exceptionally impressed with the level of innovation, agility and resourcefulness that I witnessed across all government, education and business sectors within Guangdong,” Mouland said.
“During our short visit to Guangzhou, we forged many valuable relationships which we are now keen on further developing to build on our existing trade and investment successes.
“We’re also seeking to identify new opportunities that are aligned to our region’s competitive advantages and China’s emerging demand.
“These experiences are invaluable for all parties involved, especially in terms of knowledge exchange, expertise sharing and the joint discovery of unique and innovative solutions to address both of our states’ current and emerging food and agricultural opportunities and challenges.”
Project partners helping to facilitate the visit included Central Coast Industry Connect (CCIC), Central Coast Business Chamber, the University of Newcastle, including the Newcastle Institute of Energy & Resources (NIER), Central Coast Council and the State Government.

Source:
Media release, Oct 24
Regional Development Australia Central Coast

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SOURCE: http://www.centralcoastnews.net/2019/10/31/chinese-delegation-explores-economic-and-trade-opportunities/

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Nearly one in five sellers in high-rise suburbs lost money

WHAT do you make of this?

DESPITE aspiring First Home Buyers now tending to steer clear of newly built high-rise apartments … with apartment suburbs in freefall after tower disasters …

OWNERS are being forced to drop their price by as much as $60,000 or $ 70,000 yet developers are still forging ahead with high-rise …

THE home seller may lose this much but the developer is still set to gain as each unit is built for say $200,000 … give or take …

-high density of high-rise towers very lucrative for developers

THE Property Council is running Australia with their former policy writer at the helm … so for the next 50 years Sydney is set to grow by 107,000 people annually

47,000 Chinese fly into Australia every week; with more at Chinese New Year and Golden Week

-a huge number of homes built very quickly; the 85% defective on completion rate is likely to be maintained

-Berejiklian Govt instead of enforcing the recommendations of Lambert, Shergold and Weir proposes a ratings scorecard for builders

MORE OF THE SAME! OR ARE YOU GOING TO JACK UP SYDNEY? .. IT’S YOUR CALL

MESSAGE CAAN TO LEARN MORE!

Related Article ….

NSW Government proposes ratings scorecard for builders to prevent construction disasters

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2020/01/21/nsw-government-proposes-ratings-scorecard-for-builders-to-prevent-construction-disasters/?fbclid=IwAR0S5HrAsQhYUQqA4lILgzADmhTT80zKGkXRmIBNvbmaNHmy1hDU3VaGBwc

EXTRACT: Nearly one in five sellers in high-rise suburbs lost money

Aidan DevineAidan Devine 25 JAN 2020Opal Tower

There is an oversupply of high-rise apartments in parts of Sydney, with plenty more units still under construction. Picture: Angelo Velardo

Losses are mounting for unit sellers in Sydney’s high-rise suburbs as a recent spate of building disasters sours buyer demand for homes in large apartment towers.

Close to one in five sellers in the high density Parramatta and Canterbury-Bankstown council areas exchanged their properties for less than they paid for them, while about 15 per cent made a loss in Ryde.

Sellers also made frequent losses in the Strathfield council area – which neighbours Sydney Olympic Park’s Opal Tower, a building residents were forced to evacuate in late 2018 due to dangerous cracking.

-about 16% of sales incurred a loss for vendors: CoreLogic records for September quarter

MORE: Sydney’s auction hotspot revealed

Demand for housing at record high

-average seller in these city regions lost between $60,000 – $70,000 after 4 years

YET with the remainder of Sydney, sellers rarely lost money due to record-low interest rates fuelling housing demand.

Residents of Olympic Park’s Opal Tower were forced to evacuate over dangerous cracking.

-more than 90% of city sellers sold with a profit with average profits from $70,000 in Burwood to $1.1 M in the northern beaches.

-almost 99% of Mosman sellers made a profit; just over 95% of sales vendor profit in council areas of Waverley, North Sydney and Hunters Hill

CoreLogic head of research Eliza Owen said sellers in high-density suburbs were struggling because there were too many other vendors to compete with at a time when buyers were turning away from high-rise units.

“Cracking would have made buyers weary … property is probably the biggest purchase they’ll make,” Ms Owen said.

“There’s also a huge supply of (high-rise) properties up for sale, most of which were meant to appeal to investors.

Ms Owen added there was a rush from some investors in high density areas to sell because rents were falling and vacancies were rising, increasing their holding costs.

-investors selling properties were head to head with developers who continue to release new housing

nearly 45,000 new units recently approved across Parramatta and Ryde LGAs

Realestate.com.au head of economic research Cameron Kusher said the longer-term outlook for unit sellers was more positive.Darmo Aerial

Parramatta has one of the biggest pipelines of new unit projects.

It would likely take 18-24 months for excess housing stock in areas like Parramatta to get absorbed if population growth trends continued, he said.

-sellers in the northern beaches and eastern suburbs selling for large profits with 3 and 4 bedroom homes appealing to families; dominant in the market

SELLERS WHO LOST MONEY (by LGA)

Parramatta 19%

Canterbury 18%

Ryde 16%

Strathfield 16%

Cumberland 15%

Source: CoreLogic

SOURCE:

https://www.realestate.com.au/news/nearly-one-in-five-sellers-in-highrise-suburbs-lost-money/?rsf=syn:news:nca:dt:spa

Yuhu’s quick, quiet tower sale leaves millions on the table

australian-financial-review
Yuhu

Local developer Sarkis Nassif paid $113.9 million for 20 Berry Street, North Sydney.

ARE ‘birds of a feather flocking together’? … Huang and Sarkis Nassif from the Nassif developer family. Unlike his brother Jean, Sarkis was the 2017 property person of the year, as named by lobby group the Urban Taskforce.

However, some of us may believe that is not a recommendation!

Unlike Jean, Sarkis has not reached the notoriety of ‘Bodgy builds, bubbles and a big Lamborghini: Parramatta developer hits a road block

Back in February 2019 the LEC Commissioner could not satisfy herself about the “structural integrity” of the work that had been done and ordered a halt to any construction at the site

-“commercial discussions” with the developer have not been finalised.

Read more: https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2019/02/15/bodgy-builds-bubbles-and-a-big-lamborghini-parramatta-developer-hits-a-road-block/

Yuhu’s quick, quiet tower sale leaves millions on the table

We sum up from the AFR Report:

Huang Xiangmo’s Yuhu Group has left millions of dollars on the table after the Chinese billionaire opted for a quick and discreet sale of his North Sydney office tower rather than a high profile sales campaign.

A private sale was conducted privately of the 15-storey tower at 20 Berry Street for $114 M between Yuhu Group and local developer, Sarkis Nassif

-no official sales agent was engaged

-the settlement period was three weeks compared to a typical time of two months!

AS revealed in previous reports exiled Chinese billionaire and property tycoon, Huang Xiangmo handed over the reins to his son Jimmy Huang. Xiangmo has transferred assets out of his name since the ATO began investigating his affairs in 2016. And he has been under investigation by NSW ICAC.

-several private Chinese groups were interested in the North Sydney property

-they required FIRB approval which can take 6 weeks following a deal

-the offer from Nassif without a due diligence period and immediate exchange sealed the deal

‘Industry sources say “a lot was left on the table” and that Yuhu Group could have reaped between $125 million and $140 million had it not rushed the sale.

That’s about $27 million more than the $113.9 million paid by Mr Nassif for the office tower.’

-Mandarin International Investment; previously wholly owned by Mr Huang, bought the 20 Berry Street property in 2015 for $59 million

-Huang transferred the shares in Mandarin International to his son following his Australian residency visa being revoked

‘The Tax Office has told the Federal Court it may seek bankruptcy orders against Mr Huang, after raising concerns he had transferred assets out of his name last year and removed himself as a beneficiary of family trusts which hold the Yuhu Group assets.’

-after his visa was cancelled he offloaded his half share in One Circular Quay, a waterfront apartment and hotel project

-and Jewel, a mixed-use development on the Gold Coast for $575M

-developer Poly pulled out of the Eastwood Shopping Centre after undertaking due diligence

‘The Berry Street sale comes after The Australian Financial Review revealed Mr Huang was planning to sell the property off market in an unusually tight timeframe of just two weeks.’

Yuhu’s quick, quiet tower sale leaves millions on the table

INGRID FUARY-WAGNER, ANGUS GRIGG AND NEIL CHENOWITH JAN 23, 2020

SOURCE: https://www.commercialrealestate.com.au/news/yuhus-quick-quiet-tower-sale-leaves-millions-on-the-table-2-922995/

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HOW can the 'Missing Middle' supply enough Homes? Because …

OVER the next 50 Years the Plan is for Melbourne and Sydney to grow … by 92,000 and 107,000 people annually by bringing in more migrants … read VIBRANTS …

CURRENTLY 47,000 Chinese fly into Australia every week with even more during ‘Chinese New Year’ and ‘Golden Week’ …

THAT means a huge amount of homes built very quickly and townhouses and duplex cannot keep up with that demand! How will the 85% defective builds be addressed? How likely is that with the very poooor response from the Berejiklian Grubment?

Read: NSW Government proposes ratings scorecard for builders to prevent construction disasters

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2020/01/21/nsw-government-proposes-ratings-scorecard-for-builders-to-prevent-construction-disasters/?fbclid=IwAR0S5HrAsQhYUQqA4lILgzADmhTT80zKGkXRmIBNvbmaNHmy1hDU3VaGBwc

Related Article:

Aussies aren’t “choosing to live in apartments”. They are forced to.

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2020/01/21/aussies-arent-choosing-to-live-in-apartments-they-are-forced-to/?fbclid=IwAR0ITvPWD-FxFCGp4LmqnL4KeCg4b0QRVz_NznmZ72aaoLNab-TQHzYCaRU

AUSTRAYA runs the World’s biggest IMMIGRATION program … how can we ever have affordable housing??

WHAT A SET-UP!

WHYdo we allow the Grubs to get away with this? As they destroy where we live too!

Image may contain: tree, plant, sky, outdoor and nature

CAAN Photo: High-rise PRECINCT encroaching on a Sydney urban bushland cul-de-sac! View from home owner’s backyard. We no longer have any rights! …. ANYWHERE!

PARENTS, Retirees, Boomers … let’s do something … we have the time!

No need for services offering to send a message on behalf of VOTERS for fees! FFS!

COPY and paste this article into an email and send to your Contacts

.across Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

EVERYONE share the email

NEXT start the conversation in your street … among like-concerned people

SEND a ‘community email’ to your local MPs with your Demands:

.that the anti-money laundering laws for the Real Estate Gatekeepers be enforced

.return immigration to 70,000 p.a. and stop Visa manipulation

.stop the overseas sell-off of residential property

FOLLOW-UP with an email to THE EDITOR of both local and major newspapers notifying of the response or non-response to the demands sent to your local MPs

The Sydney Morning Herald:

letters@smh.com.au.

The Australian:

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/editorial

The Australian Financial Review:

https://www.afr.com/contact-us/letters-to-the-editor

The Daily Telegraph:

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/opinion/letter-to-the-editor

AND make your objections known to the Editor of the ABC … AND Facebook Pages of other Media outlets

IMAGINE this happening across Australia …

NOW READ the article from Leith Van Onselen from MACRO BUSINESS

Why the “missing middle” will never supply enough homes

By Leith van Onselen in Australian Property

January 24, 2020 |

CoreLogic’s Eliza Owen has penned an interesting article on the dearth of medium density housing being built across the “missing middle” of Australia’s cities:

The ‘missing middle’ refers to a paucity of new development that provides low rise, medium density housing options, such as townhouses and duplexes. Some definitions of medium density also include low rise unit builds.

Medium density housing options can be important for young families who seek a more affordable housing option close to city centres, but require more space than in a unit, or older Australians wishing to downsize in their current area of residence to reduce housing costs in retirement.

As populations continue to converge in metropolitan regions, demand for such diverse housing options are likely to grow.

The development of more medium density housing in Australia is particularly efficient for infilling major metropolitan areas, because it takes advantage of established transport and social infrastructure.

The trend of a relatively small portion of dwellings planned across townhouses and smaller unit blocks was fairly persistent across LGA regions.

Of the 478 regions with approved dwellings over the year, an average of 14.9% of dwellings were approved as townhouses, duplexes or in unit blocks with 3 storeys or less.

This is higher than the average across existing stock, with ABS data suggesting councils currently have an average of 11.9% medium-density dwellings.

As dwelling prices are expected to continue rising in 2020, and affordability resurges as an issue for buyers, demand for cheaper housing options will only rise. If development continues to focus on the two extremes of density, metropolitan areas may see an erosion of diverse age and family demographics.

The below chart of dwelling approvals summarises the situation at the national level:

As shown above, there were 26,100 townhouses approved in the year to November 2019, representing only 15% of total dwellings approved across Australia.

The situation is similar in NSW and VIC, which are Australia’s two fastest growing jurisdictions:

Townhouses represented only 16% and 17% of dwelling approvals across NSW and VIC in the year to November 2019.

That said, believing that the “missing middle” can solve Australia’s housing supply and affordability issues is a pipe dream.

Melbourne and Sydney are projected to grow by 92,000 and 107,000 people annually over the next half century, due to mass immigration:

Such a tidal wave of people will necessarily need a huge amount of homes built very quickly to keep up. And this is simply not possible through townhouses and duplexes.

Think about it from a development perspective. What is easier: purchasing 20,000 detached homes in established suburbs, demolishing the existing dwellings and building two townhouses on each (for 40,000 townhouses). Or building 800 high-rises with 50 apartments in each.

Image may contain: sky, cloud, skyscraper and outdoor

CAAN Photo: Chinese developer Greenland ‘Lachlan’s Line’ North Ryde/Macquarie Park and Chinese Country Garden ‘Ryde Garden’ in the background. Awfulizers towering over the village of North Ryde.

Obviously, development is going to go down the path of least resistance and will continue to be concentrated in high-rise apartments and greenfield houses.

Image may contain: sky, skyscraper, tree, cloud and outdoor

CAAN Photo: Chinese JQZ; Waterloo Road, Macquarie Park

No photo description available.
Photo: the Greenfields Housing Code for tiny lots of 200M2 X 6M wide; no room for the shade of a tree! As with high-rise high density like this developers make a motzer!

Ultimately, the best way to ‘solve’ Australia’s chronic housing supply issues and housing affordability woes is to remove the artificial demand-driver of the problems. That is, slash immigration back to the historical norm of less than 100,000 a year:

Australia will never have affordable housing while it runs one of the world’s biggest immigration programs.

Image may contain: sky, cloud, skyscraper, tree, car and outdoor

CAAN Photo: JQZ Chinese Precinct development … view from carpark; an eyesore that has replaced commercial buildings and jobs for local Australians

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/why-the-missing-middle-will-never-supply-enough-homes/

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AUSTRALIAs WATER Supply on a Collision Course with POPULATION

Climate change is already making it harder to fill Australia's main dams, such as Warragamba, and the problems are likely to get worse, new research finds.

Climate change is already making it harder to fill Australia’s main dams, such as Warragamba, and the problems are likely to get worse, new research finds.CREDIT:BRENDAN ESPOSITO

The Thomson Dam, Melbourne's largest reservoir, is about 56 per cent full.

The Thomson Dam, Melbourne’s largest reservoir, is about 56 per cent full.CREDIT:WAYNE TAYLOR

THE SOLUTION IS OBVIOUS …

If things were not so crook(ed) in Australia this predicament would be readily solved …

KEY POINTS …

climate change is reducing inflows into Australia’s water catchments

looking at an average of 20 per cent reduced reliabilityacross all the catchments

additional 17.5 million people to increase water demand; as supply is reduced from lower rainfall and rising evapotranspiration rates

Australia’s water supply on a collision course with population

By Leith van Onselen in Immigration

24 JANUARY 2020

new study by University of NSW scientists warns that climate change is reducing inflows into Australia’s water catchments, which will cause chronic water shortages as Australia’s population balloons:

“We are looking at an average of 20 per cent reduced reliability in the future across all the catchments considered,” said Ashish Sharma, a professor at UNSW’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and an author of the report.

“While this might not matter a lot up north where you have lower demands compared to inflows, this is pretty serious down south where the demands are high and we are already seeing impacts of the drought,” he said…

Compounding the problem will be the likelihood that cities will lift consumption of water for parks, gardens and other uses.

“Because of that increased demand, you’ll see a greater reduction in reliability [of storage],” Professor Sharma said…

Professor Sharma said that, while authorities could find further ways to reduce demand, at some point a threshold would be crossed and governments would have to make bigger investments…

The mass immigration ‘Big Australia’ policy guarantees chronic water shortages.

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ medium (panel B) projections, Australia’s population will swell by 17.5 million people over the 48 years to 2066, reaching 43 million people:

As shown above, all of Australia’s projected population growth will come from net overseas migration (NOM) – both directly as migrants step off the plane and indirectly as they have children (counted as ‘natural increase’).

The additional 17.5 million people will massively increase water demand at the same time as supply is reduced from lower rainfall and rising evapotranspiration rates due to climate change.

Put simply, the ‘Big Australia’ mass immigration policy is a fundamental threat to Australia’s water security.

The best thing our policy makers could do to safeguard the nation’s water supplies is slash immigration, which is running at around triple the historical average.

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

Growing water crisis could force expansion of Sydney’s desalination plant

A growing water crisis has forced the NSW government to begin planning for an expansion of Sydney’s desalination plant in the next couple of years if significant rain doesn’t fall.

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/australias-water-supply-on-a-collision-course-as-population-swells/

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AUSTRALIAN C.rr.ption worsened significantly since 2012

SHARE!

READ MORE!

DESPITE THIS the government has abandoned efforts to bring real estate gatekeepers into the AML regulatory net …

SHARE ON FACEBOOK … then copy and paste this report into an email for your contacts! EVERYONE should know!

Start the conversation across Sydney, NSW and Australia!

Australian corruption worsened “significantly” since 2012

By Leith van Onselen in Australian Economy

Transparency International has released its latest * corruption index, which reveals that Australia is among 21 nations where perceived corruption has worsened “significantly” over the past eight years.

*Copied below!

From The Guardian:

Australia scored 77 from a possible 100, the same mark as last year. It means Australia has again failed to reverse a longer-term decline of eight points since 2012

Australia is listed as being among 21 nations that have “significantly declined” in the same time period.

The Transparency International Australia chief executive, Serena Lillywhite, said the “corrosive” influence of money in politics was continuing to undermine government integrity.

“What the corruption perceptions index clearly shows is that the murkier the political donations trail is, the more corrupt a country is perceived to be,” Lillywhite told the Guardian…

Australia is among two-thirds of countries across the world that are either stagnating or showing signs of deterioration in their anti-corruption efforts…

Countries that perform well on the CPI gave stronger campaign finance regulation, and broader political consultation, not just listening to well connected individuals and special interest groups,” she said…

Scores are based on perceptions of corruption among experts and business executives. The aggregate score combines 13 surveys and assessments of corruption from a variety of reputable bodies.

*In 2017, Transparency International ranked Australia as having the world’s weakest property anti-money laundering (AML) rules, failing all 10 priority areas.

Since then, the federal government has abandoned efforts to bring real estate gatekeepers into the AML regulatory net.

CAAN: The Morrison Government exempted the Real Estate Gatekeepers from the second tranche of the AML LAWS in October 2018!

LVO:

When combined with various donations and grants scandals, no wonder perceived corruption has worsened.

Leith Van Onselen

Leith van Onselen is Chief Economist at the MB Fund and MB Super. Leith has previously worked at the Australian Treasury, Victorian Treasury and Goldman Sachs.

Image result for photo doors wide open transparency international

SOURCE: https://www.macrobusiness.com.au/2020/01/australia-corruption-worsened-significantly-since-2012/

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CORRUPTION AND UNSOLICITED PROPOSALS: RISKS, ACCOUNTABILITY AND BEST PRACTICES

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This Anti-Corruption Helpdesk brief was produced in response to a query from one of Transparency International’s national chapters. The Anti-Corruption Helpdesk is operated by Transparency International and funded by the European Union

Query

What are the corruption risks posed by unsolicited proposals (USPs)? If governments choose to consider USPs, how can they minimise risks, and ensure transparency and accountability in the delivery of infrastructure projects? What are the international best practices in USP policies?

Summary

Unsolicited proposals (USPs) have grown in popularity as an innovative, cost-saving type of public-private partnership. However, the unsolicited, sometimes secretive, nature of these projects and the barriers to traditional competition in public-private partnerships make them vulnerable to corruption risks. This brief details concrete steps governments can take to minimise corruption risk when dealing with USPs during the submission, evaluation, study development, procurement and implementation phases. General best practices include clearly explained guidelines with detailed timelines, opening the project for competitive tender when it has been accepted, establishing clear guidelines for the government and private sector roles, and disclosing details of the project to the public as early as possible to mitigate perceptions of corruption. It concludes with some successful examples of past projects.

Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Corruption and USPs
  3. Minimising risk and ensuring accountability in USP policies
  4. Best practices in USP policies

Main points

  • USPs are vulnerable to several corruption risks because of their low levels of transparency and competition.
  • There are mechanisms that governments can enact before even receiving a USP to be transparent and accountable about the submission and evaluation process.
  • When proceeding with a USP there are ways that governments can make the tender and procurement process open to competition to eliminate opportunities for patronage or kickbacks.
  • Clear evaluations and specific ex ante timelines throughout the process can reduce opportunities for corrupt coordination and mitigate the public’s doubts.

Authors

Jessie Bullock, tihelpdesk@transparency.org

Reviewer:

Marie Chêne, Transparency International

Date

15/01/2020

Tags

SOURCE:    https://knowledgehub.transparency.org/helpdesk/corruption-and-unsolicited-proposals-risks-accountability-and-best-practices

WHY PENRITH is the Place to be for Property Developers

Bernard Salt: Investing in property? Here’s the place

MEANWHILE … Western Sydney especially Penrith is where it’s much hotter than on the Coast and not only the heat but pollution is trapped in a land-locked basin … with less than 6 per cent of the Cumberland Plain Woodland remaining, view this related article:

HEATWAVES … add Thermal Mass from Overdevelopment … Heat Island Effect and Mortality … e.g. Penrith …

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2020/01/14/21391/

PERHAPS that is why Bernard Salt, MD of the Demographics Group and urban commentator has been called in by the developer lobby?

Mr Salt writes in ‘Investing in Property? Here’s the Place’ It doesn’t matter whether you’re a big developer or a small player in property — this is the city where you should spend your money.

City-apartment builders who have done well in the past decade should consider making inquiries about Penrith, on the Nepean River. Picture: John Appleyard
City-apartment builders who have done well in the past decade should consider making inquiries about Penrith, on the Nepean River. Picture: John Appleyard

Further, that he will identify parts of NSW that should experience rising demand for housing in the coming decade. Salt outlines that by 2031 ­Australia was expected to contain 30.3 million people, up from 25.6 million today.

From the ABS, the projected figure for NSW, for example, shows a population of 9.6 million, while for Victoria the equivalent figure is 8.1 million.

That in ‘Australia’s fastest-growing states where infrastructure delivery is stretched, and where anti-growth sentiment is perhaps most acute, the state’s outlook is (admittedly moderately) less bullish than is Canberra’s outlook.’

In Salt’s Visual 2 he compares population change by municipality in NSW between 2001 and 2018 NSW delivered 1.5 Million extra residents that with NSW’s outlook between 2018 and 2036 the extra population estimated by the State is 2.1 Million … he writes

‘ I reckon the property industry is a good place to be in NSW over the next decade and a half.

Salt then reveals the top five ‘likely upshifters‘ in population growth over the period to 2036.

‘The best of the best is Penrith, and which will accommodate much of the new Sydney airport’s infrastructure and associated housing and job generation.’

345,000 residents in 2036; up by 136,000 from the 2018 figure of 209,000

Penrith added 33,000 residents over 17 years to 2018

-over the following 18 years to 2036 the growth is expected to be 136,000

The upshifter factor is the difference between 33,000 and 136,000 or 103,000

Children cool off in the Nepean River near Penrith. Picture: Jonathan Ng
Children cool off in the Nepean River near Penrith. Picture: Jonathan Ng

THEN … Salt writes:

‘Perhaps with all this airport-­inspired upshifter growth Penrith will go through an associated cultural shift and a groovy Surry Hills kind of community will emerge in Penrith?

Yeah, sure Bernie, what part of a 24 hour flight path over chockablock ‘GREENFIELD housing estates’ (200Msq X 6M wide lots) with neighbouring freight factories, fuel tankers, trucks, aircraft noise and pollution will make Penrith groovy?

FROM the locals …

‘Let’s be real: those flooding the place won’t be looking for lattes and indie art and music. They’ll be looking for sleep, and day-dreaming about schools and homes without overhead noisy flights and fuel dumps. Meanwhile, the politicians who care more about China’s interests than its consituents (do you think 24 hours a day to service Asia was an afterthought?) give themselves a pay rise and retire on their super profits laughing.’

Salt goes on … ‘Other upshifter communities in NSW include Blacktown, Camden, Liverpool and The Hills Shire.

But just as there are upshifters, places when the growth inflection shifts upwards, there are also downshifters, places where the momentum of growth is expected to slow down.

Take, for example, the City of Sydney, which by 2036 is expected to contain 296,000 residents.

-over the 17 years to 2018, this ­municipality added 111,000 net extra residents; all those apartments in the south Sydney area?

-over the next 18 years to 2036 the growth is expected to be 56,000.

Salty recommends city developers consider opportunities in Penrith

Then lists other downshifter places … the northern beaches, Waverley, Tweed, Queanbeyan

AS with the notoriety he reached over the ‘smashed Avo’ he writes …

‘I want all Australian property players to survive and thrive. Reading the tectonic (demographic) shifts … This weekend perhaps take a Sunday drive to Penrith and see if the figures match the reality.’

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VIEW SOURCE: https://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/property/why-penrith-is-the-place-to-be-for-property-developers/news-story/e6f6aafabb23600a95a1598a2fd6bfb3?fbclid=IwAR0yX5Eb1HzMxKlw-YnZgOe1fR3dNLW9EzZZLeqV0Hb_US2KYtMj5Ru6ZRU

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How the CoronaVirus started in China

AND what this means for Australians … are we at the risk of a Pandemic … at the very least an Epidemic?

BECAUSE the Top End of Town keep telling us that …

… with their commitment to A Big Australia … that SYDNEY is Growing!

NEWS Report 24 Jan 2020 47,000 Chinese visit Australia each week with EVEN more in ‘Chinese New Year’ and ‘Golden Week’ …. WT ****!

RELATED ARTICLE …

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2020/01/23/coronavirus-traps-mega-city-wuhan-residents-in-a-real-life-horror-movie/

BECAUSE they draw their market from the Chinese to launder their ‘hot money‘ in Australian real estate …

The Chinese New Year, is one of two annual spikes from offshore buyers, including a “golden week” holiday toward the end of the year when leading Realtors make $Millions like Sothebys Australia, and Black Diamondz Monika Tu

RELATED ARTICLE …

Fancy cars, luxury brands and multimillion-dollar property: Agents ready for New Year ..

https://caanhousinginequalitywithaussieslockedout.com/2020/01/18/fancy-cars-luxury-brands-and-multimillion-dollar-property-agents-ready-for-new-year/

HOW long does the CoronaVirus take to incubate? Is it as long as 2 weeks?

The ideal fuel conditions for a new virus are lots of humans living and interacting close together — like a large city.*

WHY not send a letter to the Editor with your Objections at:

The Sydney Morning Herald:

letters@smh.com.au.

The Australian:

https://www.theaustralian.com.au/editorial

The Australian Financial Review:

https://www.afr.com/contact-us/letters-to-the-editor

The Daily Telegraph:

https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/opinion/letter-to-the-editor

AND make your objections known to the Editor of the ABC
AND Facebook Pages of other Media outlets

ANALYSIS

How the coronavirus started in China — and why that’s actually a saving grace

By Simon Reid

24 JANUARY 2020

A crowd of commuters line up outside a train station, many wearing face masks to protect against smog

PHOTO: China is one country that has undergone the most substantial and rapid transformation in its human demography. (Reuters: China Daily CDIC)

RELATED STORY: ‘Super-spreader’ fears after report of one coronavirus patient infecting 14 people

RELATED STORY: Chinese city goes into lockdown as coronavirus death toll doubles

RELATED STORY: One potential case under investigation after flight from coronavirus epicentre arrives in Sydney

The emergence of a new coronavirus in China has once again raised the spectre of a global pandemic.

It wasn’t that long ago that we had our last pandemic (the H1N1 virus in 2009, also known as “swine flu”) and less than 20 years since the 2003 emergence of SARS, another coronavirus that was highly lethal to humans.

The emergence of the “new” disease requires the virus to spill over or “jump species” from its reservoir into people. This event is complex and needs close contact, as well as a virus that can infect humans (not many animal viruses can).

*To truly emerge, the virus then has to possess the ability to infect other humans (even fewer can do this).

*The concern now is that the new coronavirus is showing it can do this last step, albeit, in a limited way so far.

The human-animal interface

Humans mostly interact with domesticated animals directly through agriculture and as pets.

In the past, this has led to the emergence of human diseases that are still with us — for example, measles from cattle and whooping cough from dogs.

What is a coronavirus?
Here’s what we know about the novel coronavirus, or 2019-nCoV, and how worried you should be.

Humans also interact with wildlife through hunting and as a consequence of our use of their habitat to grow food and houses. This leads to diseases such as Hendra and Ebola.

The wildcard in all this is human behaviour driven by cultural and social norms. For example, the presence of live animal markets in parts of Asia is strongly associated with the spread of avian influenza and the origin of SARS — and we’re seeing it again this time with the Wuhan coronavirus developing in China.

Basically, the more we interact, the greater the probability of a spillover of a pathogen.

The more often that happens, the greater the chance of us receiving one that is perfectly suited to human-human transmission.

*The most significant driver of emergence, however, is food production

A man plucks a chicken he just killed on top of a cage full of live chickens at a street market.

PHOTO: The presence of live animal markets in parts of Asia is strongly associated with the spread of avian influenza and the origin of SARS. (Reuters: David Gray)

So why is it happening in China?

*The rate of emergence of new human pathogens appears to be accelerating. A recent study suggested that over half of all emergences are associated with food production.

This is directly related to the size and prosperity of the human population. In order to grow food, we use land, water and energy.

*If you consider that human activity is a necessary requirement, then China is one country that has undergone the most substantial and rapid transformation in its human demography and land use.

Medical staff transfer a patient at the Jinyintan hospital.

PHOTO: The emergence of the “new” disease requires the virus to spill-over or “jump species” from its reservoir into people. (Reuters)

*There have been rapid shifts in where people live (urbanisation), what they eat and how they use the land.

The food production systems needed to support this transformation are highly complex and on an industrial scale.

At the same time, there remains a strong cultural preference for live animal marketing and the consumption of a wide variety of different animal species.

Newly emerging viruses may well be a sentinel of a system that is out of balance.

What can be done to reduce the risk?

Solving the problem is not as simple as changing diets, however.

We still have to grow what we eat, largely using land, and while farmed animals are the source of many human pathogens, an increasing number come from wildlife (including bats and wild birds).

Wuhan virus ‘super-spreaders’
One of China’s top health experts warns potential “super-spreaders” could worsen the impact of the new coronavirus strain, which can now be passed between humans.

There is no guarantee that switching away from animal diets will solve the problem, because the changes needed in the food system could have unintended impacts on other parts of our ecosystem, such as natural forests and their wildlife.

There are also extremely strong cultural preferences around diet, so it may be the hardest change to make.

The biggest risk now is the rise of “super-spreaders”. A single person (super-spreader) was responsible for moving SARS from China to a single hotel floor in Hong Kong and from there to multiple countries.

A super-spreader is a bit like a large ember in a bushfire. If an ember falls in a place with no fuel there is no fire. If it falls where there is an unlimited amount of fuel and the conditions are right, we get a wildfire.

*The ideal fuel conditions for a new virus are lots of humans living and interacting close together — like a large city.*

That is not to say there is nothing we can do.

a woman points a device as people walk past her at an airport

PHOTO: The ideal fuel conditions for a new virus are lots of humans living and interacting close together — like a large city. (AP: Andy Wong)

Reducing the “conflict” between human and natural systems — for example, by reimagining how we use land to make better allowances for natural habitat — will help take pressure off food systems, while addressing other environmental concerns like climate change, deforestation and land degradation.

Stopping the spread

Despite the risk of “super-spreaders”, the emergence of new diseases in places like China is actually a saving grace.

China has an excellent system and massive capacity to investigate and control diseases, and the country’s response to recent disease emergences has been highly transparent, competent and effective.

two people in blue medical gowns hair netting and face masks carry a tub along a road outside near a car

PHOTO: China has an excellent system and massive capacity to investigate and control diseases. (Reuters)

There is a global effort to monitor infectious diseases and coordinate response and information-sharing, led by the World Health Organisation.

It requires countries to demonstrate they have holistic systems that include cooperation between animal and human health agencies (One Health).

This works well in rich countries, but many poorer nations need support.

The scariest threat is the prospect of antimicrobial resistance.

A man wearing a facemask drags his luggage in front of a train station.

PHOTO: There is a global effort to monitor infectious diseases and coordinate response and information sharing. (AP: Mark Schiefelbein)

*If we lose antibiotics, then we are back to square one, with simple skin infections and seasonal influenza outbreaks resulting in high death tolls.

Our biggest risk now is human apathy. Unfortunately, antimicrobial resistance does not raise the pulse of politicians like a good outbreak of SARS.

Simon Reid is associate professor of communicable disease control at the University of Queensland.

A man plucks a chicken he just killed on top of a cage full of live chickens at a street market.

SOURCE: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-01-24/coronavirus-came-from-animals-stopping-spread-not-simple/11893420

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